We first introduced you to Audioengine a little over a year ago with our review of its HD6 speakers. At the time, the combination of sound and wireless connectivity made that pair one of our favorites on the market. Fast forward a year later and many of the same features can be found in the smaller HD3 Wireless. The Texas-based Audioengine is responsible for a wide range of powered and passive audio solutions. How does its latest stack up? Hit the jump for more…

Design

The smaller HD3 wireless speakers take many of its design cues from its larger sibling. Audioengine calls it a “retro-forward” look, which feels both old-school and modern at the same time. Satin Black (shown above), Walnut and Cherry furniture-grade veneers provide a classic shell around the internal electronics.

Just the like the HD6, an aluminum control panel can be found along the bottom of the front, offering power controls, volume and a 3.5mm headphone jack. The front fabric panel can be removed to display the domes and tweeters, if you prefer a more industrial look.

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To no one’s surprise, the build-quality here is excellent and Audioengine includes a three-year warranty with purchase. Best of all, you’ll find each of the necessary cables to get started. That includes RCA, 3.5mm, USB and braided wires for connecting the two speakers together. All of which comes wrapped in a soft fabric bag, which is a nice attention to detail.

Connectivity

Audioengine’s big change on the HD3 is the addition of Bluetooth connectivity. The HD6 was the first to receive this industry standard, so bringing it to the smaller version is a no-brainer.

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One of the reasons that I have come to love Audioengine products is that it doesn’t skimp on the inputs. This trend continues here with RCA, 3.5mm and USB connections. That means it can handle a variety of sources, be it your Mac, TV or smartphone, simultaneously.

Sound

This is the third pair of Audioengine speakers that I’ve been able to go hands-on with in the last few years, and a familiar trend continues to emerge. Warmth and balance are the keys to the signature sound that emits from these speakers. Whether it’s classical music or the latest EDM track, the HD3 Wireless can handle it all.

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From L to R: HD6, HD3, A2+

Audioengine continues to blow me away with its ability to crank out speakers that produce “how does it come from that little package” sound? Sure, the HD3 won’t fill a room quite like its big brother, but for an office or bedroom, it does a top-notch job.

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Conclusion

I’ve heard some pretty bad Bluetooth speakers over the last few years. The race to the bottom has left the low-end flooded with poor reproductions. Audioengine was already cranking out quality speakers, but didn’t rush to meet the wireless trend.

Its decision to hold-off until now has delivered my favorite stereo Bluetooth setup to date. Its soundstage stands on-par with the Sonos PLAY:1 at a comparable price when a two-speaker setup is considered. As we’ve said in past Audioengine reviews, despite the higher price tag, the return on investment is guaranteed. This continues with the HD3 Wireless.

Audioengine sells the HD3 Wireless Speakers for $399.